Conception And Actuality Of The Family | Laissez-Passer

  • Conception And Actuality Of The Family

    The family as the core of human coexistence has been subject to social change over the centuries. In the meantime, the modern concept of family encompasses many forms of life: What they have in common is that children live in the household.

    Introduction

    In recent years, family and parenthood are Germany has become a hot topic of public discussion. The increase in illegitimate lifestyles and the low birth rate have played a major role in this. However, the question is also asked whether families can still do justice to their tasks today: namely to look after and bring up the children or to support each other within the generations in solidarity in everyday life. Politicians and the population have become aware that the family and home its importance for people’s life planning has changed over the last few decades if you’re looking for beautiful curtains for your home in London, visit the Curtain Makers London for more details. All areas of our society are affected and therefore need to be addressed appropriately.

    Family concept and family forms

    Most people still think of a family as the long-term cohabitation of a mother and a father with their children. The constitutional fathers and mothers also had this model in mind when they placed marriage and the family under the “special protection of the state” in Article 6 of the Basic Law. In fact, according to the Federal Statistical Office, in 2007 about three-quarters of all families had underage children with their married and mostly biological parents. But in just under a fifth the children lived with only one parent. Parents are also increasingly refraining from marrying: Almost 60 percent of all births in 2007 in East Germany were illegitimate, in West Germany, this proportion was around 24 percent. 17, In 2007, four percent of families in East Germany and a good five percent of West Germans lived together with their parents unmarried. For a still small but increasing number of reasons, same-sex partners now also have a family. These figures correspond to the fact that in 2005 around 53 percent of women and men aged 35 to 44 lived together with children. Between six and seven percent in this age group were single parents. So the “conventional” idea of ​​a family mentioned above is still applicable in many cases. However, it no longer fully does justice to the variety of different family constellations today. In our society, since the “golden age of marriage” of the 1950s and 1960s, when many marriages of the conventional pattern were still concluded, the proportion of “non-conventional” family relationships, which can be very complex, has been increasing in our society.

    Nuclear family

    In order to do justice to this change, the Federal Statistical Office adapted its concept of family to the changed circumstances in 2005. So-called parent-child communities are recorded as families in the microcensus’s new way of life: This means married couples, illegitimate and same-sex unions, or single mothers and fathers who share a household with unmarried children living together. The children can be biological children, stepchildren, foster children, or adoptive children of both or one of the parents. This family concept corresponds to the model of the nuclear family. If both parents do not belong to a household, it is referred to as a single-parent family. It may have arisen because the child lived with a parent without a partner from the start or because the parents separated after a while and may have entered into a new relationship later.

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